Apa Yang Dimaksud Headquarters Agreement

Between 1 March and 17 May 1865, the French government received delegations from 20 European countries for the first International Telegraph Conference in Paris. This meeting culminated in the International Telegraph Convention, signed on May 17, 1865. [8] [9] Following the 1865 conference, the International Telegraph Union, the predecessor of the modern ITU, was the first international standardization organization to be established. The Union has been tasked with implementing the fundamental principles of international telegraphy. These include the use of Morse code as the international telegraph alphabet, the protection of the secrecy of correspondence and the right of everyone to use international telegraphy. [8] [10] [11] [12] On December 14, 2012, 89 of the 152 countries signed an amended version of the regulations. Non-signatory countries included the United States, Japan, Canada, France, Germany, New Zealand, India and the United Kingdom. U.S. Chief Terry Kramer, a delegation, said, “We cannot support a treaty that does not support the multistatic model of Internet governance.” [55] [56] [57] The disagreement appears to relate to language in the revised ITRs, which focused on ITU`s role in combating unwanted mass communications, network security, and a resolution on internet governance calling for government participation in internet issues in different ITU forums.

[58] Despite the considerable number of countries that have not signed, ITU issued a press release: “A new global telecommunications contract has been concluded in Dubai.” International customs are evidence of a practice universally recognized as law;┬áThe term “headquarters agreement” must be understood in the following two instruments: although there is no specific definition of “headquarters agreements”, we conclude that the headquarters agreement is an agreement that governs the obligations of each party and grants international organizations legal status, special rights and immunities to perform their functions in the sovereign territory of the host State. . . .